BCCF E-MAIL BULLETIN #21


Your editor welcomes any and all submissions for this Bulletin - news of 
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Stephen Wright

[N.B. back issues of this Bulletin are now available on the BCCF web site:  
BC Chess Federation Newsletters ]


CONTINUING KERES COVERAGE

News of this year's Keres travelled far and wide, aside from the usual report 
in The Week in Chess by Mark Crowther ; John Henderson discussed the 
tournament in his Scotsman column, which subsquently appeared on two web sites (look 
for the June 3rd entries): 

 John B. Henderson's Chess Column: The Scotsman daily chess news
 Latest Chess News  

(The latter is Jeremy Silman's web page, a good place to browse in general).

A report also found its way onto the ChessBase site (again, scroll down to 
the June 3rd entry), this time including 10 tactical exercises drawn from this 
year's games:

 Chess News, Chess Programs and Databases 

And last but not least, there was also a report in Jonathan Berry's The Globe 
and Mail column of May 31st.

Here are the last three of Jack Yoos' annotated games; the first four 
appeared in the last Bulletin:

Orlov,G - Yoos,J [D07] Keres mem 28th Vancouver (5.1), 18.05.2003

Georgi and I have had a very good friendly rivalry so far. This is the eighth 
time we have played and most have the games have been very rich and 
fastinating. Georgi is easily a class stronger than I am, but by getting good opening 
positions against him I has managed to keep our score level going into this 
game. Georgi was in very good form this tournament and scored a perfect 7-0 to 
win by the tournament by a 1.5 points. 1.d4 d5 I was originally going to roll 
the dice and play a risky KID against Georgi, but after preparing a Chigorin for 
Teplitsky I became enthusiastic about this opening. 2.Nf3 [2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 e5 
was our last Chigorin game which I lost at the 2001 Keres Tournament.( If he 
had repeated I was going to play 3...dxc4) ] 2...Nc6 3.e3 [I also thought that 
Georgi might try 3.c4 Bg4 4.cxd5 Bxf3 5.dxc6 Bxc6 6.Nc3 against me since he 
got a bad position playing the black side of this against Dave Herder some years 
ago. I had prepared 6...Nf6 7.f3 e5!? 8.dxe5 Nd7 9.Bf4 Bc5 10.e4 Qe7] 3...Bg4 
4.c4 e6 [4...e5 Is a reasonable alternative.] 5.a3!? This looks funny, but it 
has a lot of merit. It prevents ...Bb4 and prepares b4-b5. 5...Nf6 6.Nbd2 a6 
Preventing a future Bb5 and anticipating b4-b5. 7.Be2 Be7?! Passive [7...Bd6 
looking at playing dxc4 and e5. 8.c5 Be7 9.b4 Bf5 10.0-0 Ne4 and black seems 
fine to me.] 8.0-0 0-0 9.b4 Re8?! I haven't been playing the Chigorin for very 
long and I just missed the boat in this game. With the set-up Georgi has 
employed he has shut down black playing his typical play of playing for ...e5. I was 
simply not finding a plan for black in this position. I had an epiphany after 
the game when Georgi pointed out to me that black should play this like a 
Dutch! If black's pawn was on f5 we would be in a decent Stonewall Dutch, since 
white has little pressure on the center and the black's light squared bishop is 
already outside the pawn chain. Hence, I needed to play for ...Ne4. [9...Ne4; 
...Bf5] 10.Bb2 Bf8 11.Rc1 Ne7?! Here I am just wandering aimlessly waiting 
for something to happen. [11...Ne4] 12.Ne5!± Bxe2 13.Qxe2 Ng6 14.f4 Ne7 15.Ndf3! 
h6 16.Ng5!? There were other methods to beat me in this position, but my hat 
is off to Georgi that he has a sense of style. 16...hxg5 No choice but to sit 
back and see what happens. 17.fxg5 Nh7 [17...Ne4 18.Nxf7 Qc8 19.Qh5+-] 18.Nxf7 
Qc8 [18...Qd7 19.Ne5] 19.Ne5 g6 [19...Nxg5 20.Qh5 Nh7 21.Qf7+ Kh8 22.Rf3+-] 
20.Qf3 Nf5 [20...Nxg5 21.Qf6 Bh6 22.Nxg6+-; 20...Bg7 21.Qf7+ Kh8 22.Rf4 Bxe5 
23.dxe5 Nf5 24.cxd5 Re7 25.Qxg6 Rg7 26.Qxe6 Qxe6 27.dxe6 Nxe3 28.Rf7+-] 21.cxd5 
Bd6? [21...Nxg5 22.Qg4 Qd8 was my only chance. But I doubt that black is 
really holding here.] 22.Nxg6 Nxg5 23.Qg4 Qd8 24.dxe6 Nxe3 25.Qh5 Re7 1-0

Yoos,J - Kostadinov,G [B95] Keres mem 28th Vancouver (6.3), 19.05.2003

I am always a bit on guard when I play George. He is a very dangerous 
tactician who is capable of taking off much higher rated opponents if he gets the 
right kind of position. He beat me the last time we played and he drew with 
Teplitsky in the previous round. 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 
6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd3!? This is my back up line. I usually play 7.f4. Although inferior, 
this move has the benefit of avoiding the Poison Pawn and is particularly 
effective when black responds with a main line set-up of Be7, Nbd7 & Qc7. I 
played 7.f4 against George last time I had white, so I felt it was time to rotate 
the crops. 7...Be7 8.0-0-0 Nbd7 9.Be2? This is a terrible move order mistake 
which I just realized over the board. The funny thing is that my database shows 
this move order having been played quite a few times. [9.f4] 9...Qc7? 
[9...Nc5! 10.Qe3 Ng4 11.Bxg4 Bxg5 12.f4 e5!-+] 10.f4 b5 11.Bxf6 gxf6 [11...Bxf6 
12.Ndxb5; 11...Nxf6 12.Bf3 Bb7 (12...Rb8 13.e5 dxe5 14.Nc6 Rb6 15.fxe5+-; 12...e5+=) 
13.e5 dxe5 14.Ndxb5+-] 12.Bf3+= My experience in this position is that black 
has to get something in the short term against the white king or else the 
space advantage and black's central pawn structure will eventually takes its toll 
on black. Because of this black usually runs his queenside pawns down the 
board at white's king. I have found that rather than go after black right away 
with moves like f5 and Bh5 where white can get over extended, it is best to 
calmly develop and over protect the center until the action starts. 12...Bb7 
[12...b4 13.Nce2 Bb7 14.Kb1 Rc8 15.Ng3 Nc5 16.Qd2! covering c2 with an eye to h6. 
16...Qb6 17.Rhe1 a5 18.f5 e5 19.Nb3 a4 20.Nc1 b3 21.cxb3 axb3 22.a3 h5 23.Qb4! 
Qxb4 24.axb4 Na6 25.b5 Nc5 26.Re3± xb3. Yoos-Crisan, Canadian Ch, Brantford 
(birthplace of Wayne Gretzky) 1999] 13.Kb1 Rc8 14.Rhe1 Nc5 15.Qe3 b4 16.Nce2 a5 
17.Ng3 a4 18.Rc1 Qb6 19.Bh5 d5 20.Ngf5!? I have always been a sucker for a 
pretty face. In hindsight, this is an excessive move, but I don't regret it as it 
is moves like this which make chess so much fun. [20.Ndf5?! dxe4 (20...exf5 
21.exd5 Rc7 22.Nxf5+-; 20...Bf8 21.exd5 Bxd5 22.Qd4±; 20...a3 21.exd5 Bxd5 
22.Rcd1) 21.Nxe7 Kxe7 22.f5 e5-/+; 20.exd5! Bxd5 21.Ngf5 Bf8 (21...a3 22.b3 Ne4 
23.Nxe7 Kxe7 24.Nf5++-; 21...b3 22.cxb3 axb3 23.Nxb3 Be4+ 24.Qxe4) 22.Bf3±] 
20...exf5 [20...Bf8 21.exd5 Bxd5 22.Bf3 Bxf3 23.Qxf3±; 20...dxe4 21.Nxe6 Bf8 
(21...Bd8 22.Nfg7+ Ke7 23.Nxd8 Rhxd8 24.Nf5+ Kf8 25.Qg3) 22.Nxf8 Kxf8 23.Rcd1± 
xd6; 20...Nxe4 21.Ng7+ (21.Nxe6±) 21...Kd7 22.Bxf7 e5 23.fxe5 fxe5 24.Nf3±; 
20...b3 21.Nxe6±] 21.exd5 Ne4 22.Nxf5 Qxe3 23.Rxe3 Bxd5 24.Bf3?! [24.Rd1!? Bc5 
(24...Rd8 25.Bf3 Be6 26.Ng7+ Kf8 27.Nxe6+ fxe6 28.Rxd8+ Bxd8 29.Rxe4+-) A) 25.Ree1 
Rd8 26.Bf3 0-0!; B) 25.Re2 Rd8 (25...Bb7 26.Bf3 Rd8 27.Rde1±) 26.Bf3 0-0 
27.Rd3 Bc4 28.Rxd8 B1) 28...Rxd8 29.Rxe4 Bd5 30.Re1 Bxf3 31.gxf3+= Rd2 32.h4 Kf8 
33.Kc1 Rf2 (33...Rd5 34.Ne3 Rh5 35.Ng2) 34.Re4 Rxf3 35.Rc4+-; B2) 28...Nc3+! 
29.bxc3 Rxd8=+ xKb1; C) 25.Rxd5! 25...Bxe3 26.Nxe3 0-0 27.Rd4 Nc5 28.Nd5 Rfd8 
29.Bf3 with compensation] 24...Bc5? [24...Nd2+! 25.Ka1 Be6 26.Nxe7 Kxe7 27.f5 
Nxf3 28.gxf3 Rhd8 29.Kb1 (29.fxe6 Rxc2!) 29...Rc4=+] 25.Ree1 Kd7 26.Bxe4 Bxe4 
27.Rxe4 Rhe8 28.Rce1 Rxe4 29.Rxe4± Re8?! (time trouble) White has some 
continuing problems with his king position and so taking off the last pair of rooks 
makes it easier. 30.Rxe8 (time trouble) Kxe8 31.Kc1 Bg1 32.h3 Kd7 33.Kd2 Ke6 
34.Ng3 Kd5 [34...Bh2 35.Ne2 xBh2] 35.Kd3 Bb6 36.Ne4 Ke6 37.g4 h6 38.Ng3 Bf2 39.Ne4 
Bb6 40.Ng3 Bc5 41.Nf5 Bf8 42.Ke4 Kd7 43.Kd5 Kc7 44.h4 Kd7 45.h5 b3 [45...Kc7 
46.g5 fxg5 47.fxg5 hxg5 48.h6] 46.axb3 axb3 47.cxb3 1-0

Yoos,J - van Riemsdijk,H [B45] Keres mem 28th Vancouver (7.2), 19.05.2003

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Ndb5 Bb4 [I did not do my 
homework properly for this game. I had expected and prepared for a 
transposition into a Sveshnikov after 6...d6 7.Bf4 e5 8.Bg5 For some reaso n I had thought 
that he was a Sveshnikov player and that 6...Bb4 in his repetoire was just a 
surprise line. After the game he informed me that 6... Bb4 is actually his 
specialty.] 7.Bf4 This was spontaneous inspiration. I had never played this 
before and it was sort of stupid to play something so complex for the first time 
with no preparation. [7.a3 Bxc3+ 8.Nxc3 d5 9.exd5 exd5 10.Bd3 d4 11.Ne2 is the 
main line, which I have played before. I find this line rather dull and I 
wasn't in the mood.] 7...Nxe4 8.Qf3 Unfortunately I ate up a lot of time on the 
next few moves trying to work out the move order. I don't know if the move order 
here is usually considered critical, but I was seeing a lot of hidden pitfalls 
in the position. [8.Nc7+ Kf8 9.Qf3 Nxc3!? 10.bxc3 (10.Nxa8) 10...Qf6!?] 8...d5
 [8...Nxc3 9.bxc3 Ba5 (9...Qf6 10.0-0-0) 10.Nd6+ Kf8 11.0-0-0 Qf6 (11...f6 
12.Bc4 with compensation) 12.Ne4 Qg6 13.Bd6+ Kg8 14.g4!? with compensation] 
9.Nc7+ [9.0-0-0 0-0?! (9...Bxc3 10.Nc7+ Kf8 11.bxc3 transposes) 10.Nxe4 dxe4 
11.Qxe4 Qa5 12.Bd3±] 9...Kf8 [9...Ke7 10.0-0-0 Bxc3 11.bxc3 g5 12.Bg3 f5 13.Bc4 Kf7 
14.Nxd5 with the initiative] 10.0-0-0 [10.Nxa8 if white grabs the rooks black 
has a couple of good options. 10...e5 11.0-0-0 Bxc3 12.bxc3 Qa5 (12...exf4!? 
With this black can play for more. 13.Bc4 Be6 14.Qxf4 Qxa8 unclear) 13.Kb2 Bg4 
14.Qxg4 Qxc3+ Perpetual check] 10...Bxc3 11.bxc3 Rb8 [11...e5 12.Nxd5 Ng5 
(12...Bg4 13.Qxe4 Bxd1 14.Bxe5 Bh5) A) 13.Bxg5 Qxg5+ 14.Kb1 h5 15.Be2 Bf5 unclear 
(15...Bg4 16.Qg3) ; B) 13.Qe3 13...exf4 14.Qc5+ Ke8 15.Bc4 Ne6 16.Rhe1 Bd7 
17.Nxf4 Qe7 18.Qh5 Kf8 19.Bxe6 Bxe6 20.Rxe6 Qa3+ (20...fxe6 21.Ng6++-) 21.Kb1 
Qxc3 22.Nd5 Qa5 23.Re3± Ernst-Hector, Uppsala 1985; 11...g5 A) 12.Bg3!? Nxg3 
(12...f5 13.Bc4 Kf7 14.Nxd5 with the initiative) 13.Qxg3 Rb8 14.Bb5 Qe7? 
(14...f5! 15.h4 f4 16.Qxg5 Qxc7 17.Bxc6 bxc6 18.Qf6+ Kg8 19.Rd4 e5 20.Re1 Qg7 21.Qd8+ 
Qf8 22.Qg5+ Is perpetual check according to Judith Polgar.) 15.Bxc6 bxc6 
16.Nxe6+ Bxe6 17.Qxb8+ Kg7 18.Qg3± J. Polgar - Hajkova, Novi Sad 1990; B) 12.Qxe4 
12...Qxc7 (12...dxe4?? 13.Rxd8+ Nxd8 14.Bd6++-) 13.Bxc7 dxe4 14.h4 g4 15.Bb5+= 
f6 (15...Kg7) 16.Rhe1 e5 17.Rxe4 Be6 Rasik-Rogozenko, Sas van Gent 1992 
18.Bxc6 bxc6 19.Rd6 Ke7 20.Rb4+=; 11...Qe7!?] 12.Bc4N [12.Nxd5 is the move that has 
been played before in this position and it seems to lead to a position where 
white does not have too much. 12...exd5 13.Qxe4 (13.Bxb8 Qa5 with counterplay) 
13...dxe4 14.Rxd8+ Nxd8 15.Bxb8 a6 16.Bc4 Be6 17.Bd6+ (17.Rd1 Ke7 18.Bd6+ Kf6 
19.Rd4 Bxc4 20.Rxc4 Ke6 21.Ba3 f5 22.Rc7 Rg8 23.c4 h6 24.Kd2 g5 Oll-Shabanov, 
Kostroma 1985 (.5-.5 in 41 moves)) 17...Ke8 18.Bb3 Kd7 19.Rd1 Kc8 20.Kd2 .5-.5 
Nunn-Andersson, London 1984; 12.Qxe4 dxe4 13.Rxd8+ Nxd8 14.Nxe6+ (14.Bd6+ Kg8 
15.Nb5 Ra8 16.Nc7=) 14...Bxe6 15.Bxb8=] 12...Bd7 [12...e5 13.Nxd5 Bg4 14.Qxg4 
Nxf2 15.Qh5 Nxd1 16.Bg5 Qd6 17.Ne7 g6 18.Qf3 f5 19.Nxf5+-; 12...g5 13.Nxd5 
gxf4 (13...Nd6 14.Nf6 gxf4 15.Qxf4 e5 16.Qh6+ Ke7 17.Nh5±; 13...exd5 14.Bxb8+-) 
14.Nb4 Qf6 (14...Qa5 15.Qxe4 Nxb4 16.Qd4±) 15.Nxc6 bxc6 16.Qxe4 Qxc3 17.Qxf4 
(17.Rd3 Qb2+ 18.Kd2 Rg8) 17...Qb2+ 18.Kd2 Rg8] 13.Bxd5 [After 13.Nxd5 exd5 
14.Bxd5 Nf6 Black seems fine. 15.Bd6+ Kg8 16.Bxb8 Qxb8 17.Bxf7+ Kf8 18.Bh5 Ne5 
19.Qe3 Nxh5 20.Rd5 Kf7 21.Rxe5 Re8 22.Rxe8 Bxe8 23.Re1 Qf4 24.g3 Qxe3+ 25.Rxe3 
Nf6] 13...exd5 14.Nxd5 Ng5 15.Qe3 Ne6 [15...h6 16.Bc7] 16.Bd6+ Kg8 17.Bxb8 Qxb8 
18.f4? Here is where I started to lose the thread. This move looks so natural, 
but the weak back rank should have been a much higher priority. [18.Ne7+! 
Nxe7 19.Rxd7 with compensation; the problem here for black is that if white wins 
the queenside pawns, then black will lose the ending since the two knights 
will be no match for the rook and the passed pawns in an open board. 19...Nc6 
(19...Ng6 20.Qf3 Qf4+ 21.Qxf4 Ngxf4 22.g3 Ng6 23.Rxb7 a6 24.Re1 h5 25.h4±; 
19...Kf8 20.Rhd1 Nc6 21.Qf3 Ncd8 22.R1d6! Ke8 23.Qf5!+-) A) 20.Rhd1 Nf8 21.R7d6 h5 
(21...Qc7?! 22.Qe8 h6 23.Rd7 Qf4+ 24.Kb1 Ne5 25.g3 Qg4 26.Rd8 Neg6 27.f4 with 
compensation) 22.Qg5 Qc7 and black seems to be holding.; B) 20.Qf3 B1) 20...Ne5 
21.Rxb7 Qa8 22.Qd5±; B2) 20...Ncd8 21.Rhd1 B2a) 21...h6 22.R1d6 With the idea 
of Qd5 22...Kh7 23.Rxe6 fxe6 (23...Nxe6 24.Qf5+ Kg8 25.Qxf7+ Kh7 26.Qf5+ Kg8 
27.Qxe6+ Kh7 28.Qf5+ Kg8 29.Qf7+ Kh7 30.Qxg7#) 24.Qd3+ Kg8 25.Rxd8++-; B2b) 
21...h5 22.Re7 Rh6 (22...Kf8 23.Rdd7+-) 23.Re8+ Kh7 24.Qe4+ g6 25.Rdxd8 Nxd8 
26.Qd4+-; 
B3) 20...Ned8 21.Re1±; B4) 20...Qf8! This forces white off of the seventh 
rank by covering e7 and threatening Ne5 & Nc5. 21.Rxb7 Ned8 22.Rb5 (22.Rc7 Qd6 
23.Re1 g6) 22...Qe7 And now that white has gotten one of the queenside pawns it 
seems that the pressure will continue with a swap of queens. 23.Qe3! (23.Rd1 
g6 24.Qe3 Qa3+ 25.Kb1 Kg7 26.Rd7 Qa4 And black is still squirming.) 23...Qxe3+ 
24.fxe3 Kf8 25.Rd1 Ke7 26.Rbd5 Re8 27.Rd7+ Kf8 (27...Kf6 28.R1d6+ Kf5 29.Kd2 ) 
28.R1d3 Ne6 29.R3d5 Rd8 (29...Re7 30.R5d6 Ne5 31.Rxe7 Kxe7 32.Ra6±) 30.Rxd8+ 
Nexd8 31.Rd7 Ne6 32.Rb7+=] 18...Nf8! 19.g3 I was already in terrible time 
pressure at this point. [19.g4 h5! 20.f5 hxg4 21.Qg5 Qe5-+; 19.Ne7+ Nxe7 20.Qxe7 
Qxf4+ 21.Kb2 Qc7-+; 19.Nf6+ gxf6 20.Qg3+ Ng6 21.Rxd7 Kg7-/+] 19...h5 20.Ne7+ 
Nxe7 21.Qxe7 Qc8 22.Rd3 Rh6-/+ 23.Rhd1 Re6 24.Qg5 Re8 25.Qa5 g6 26.h3 [26.Qxa7 
Bf5 27.Re3 Rxe3 28.Qxe3 Qc4 29.Kb2-/+] 26...Bxh3 27.Rd8 Qe6 28.Rxe8 Qxe8 
29.Qxa7 Qc8 30.Qa5 [30.Qd4 Ne6 31.Qf6] 30...Ne6 31.Qe5 Bf5 32.Kb2 Qc4 33.Qb8+ 
[33.Rd7] 33...Kg7 34.Qxb7 Qe2 35.Rc1?? [35.Rg1] 35...Nc5-+ 36.Qb4 As my flag was 
falling I flailed out one more blunder. 0-1

[If anyone would like the annotations in ChessBase/PGN format, please let me know]


FROM NICK BEQO:

It's very nice of Jack, as the top player in BC, to send his annotations to 
our chess community!
I am looking for a player that is master level or higher, to work together on 
line, and practice different openings and variations. Keres showed that 
without practice, it is very easy to lose rating points. This happened to many BC 
masters, and I wish to all of them to get those rating points back in the next 
tournaments.
For players that are rated between 1500 - 2000 ELO I offer chess lessons with 
very reasonable price. Those that are interested, can visit my website: 
www.nickbeqo.com/chess , although it had not been updated in months, due to lack of 
time.

nickbeqo@primus.ca


30 YEARS AGO . . . by Bruce Harper

Solutions to the problem positions:

Simkovitsch Problem

1.Bf7+ Kd7 2.Be6+ Kd6 3.Bf4+ Kc5 4.Be3+ Kb4 5.Bd2+ Ka3 (forced moves are easy 
to find, but what now?) 6.Kb1 (threatening to start checking all over again) 
Qxa1 (to give Black's king a place to hide on b7) 7.Ka1! Qb7 8.Kb1! Qa6 9.Ka1 
draw!  As long as Black's queen stays on a light square, White passes.  If the 
Black queen goes to a dark square, White begins to check and Black's king 
can't escape without losing the Black queen.  A move by Black's bishop leads to 
perpetual as well, and b4 falls into a mate!

Another Simkovitsch Problem

1.Nf7 Re8 (1...Rf8 leads to an immediate draw by perpetual check: 2.Rf3+ Kg6 
3.Ne5+ Kg7 4.Rg3+) 2.Nd6+! cxd6 3.Rf3+ Kg6 4.Rg3+ Kf7 5.Rf3+ Ke7 6.Re3+ Kd8 
7.Rxe8+ Kxe8 (now White is a rook and a bishop behind!) 8.a3! (now Black has to 
untangle himself) Bb7 9.Kd1 Kf7 10.Ke1 Ra8 11.Kf1 Rh8 12.Kg1 (in the nick of 
time) Re8 13.Kf1 Kf6 (since the rook can't get in on its own, Black brings up 
his king) 14.g3 Kf5 15.f3 Re3 (progress, but...) 16.Kf2 Re8 (because after 
16...Rd3 Ke2, the rook is trapped!) 17.Kf1 draw.


FOR TOURNAMENT ORGANIZERS:

To all chess organizers in British Columbia.  The 2003/2004 Tournament 
Schedule is being put together at the end of June 2003.  Please submit your 
tournament dates now so that any conflicts can be worked out as quickly as possible in 
early July 2003.

Robert North, Tournament Coordinator, BCCF.
robertnorth10@hotmail.com
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Individual Chess Matches

Players interested in participating in rated individual chess matches with 
other players of comparable or dissimilar ratings can contact Luis E. Azmitia 
at: azmitia@interchange.ubc.ca 

Please make sure to include in the e-mail: your name, your rating, type of 
game preferred (i.e. active), and the rating range of possible opponents. Note 
that the games will be held in the Vancouver area.

Solstice Saturday Chess Fever

Date: May 24, June 07, 14, 21 and 28 (No games on May 31)
Location: Vancouver Bridge Centre, 2776 East Broadway
Rds: 5
Type: Regular Swiss
Time: Games start at 5:00 p.m.
Time Control: 30/90 G/60
Entry Fee: $25, $20 for Juniors and Masters
Prizes: $$ Ben CFC Rated
Org: James Kerry 778 773 2761 and Luc Poitras (604) 438-0496

UBC Tuesday Night Swiss - June - July 2003

Dates: June 3rd, June 10th, June 17th, June 24th, July 8th (N.B. no chess 
July 1st)
Place: UBC Henry Angus Building, Room 421
Rounds: 5 round Swiss System (one round per week)
Time: Round 1; a.s.a.p. after 7pm, Rounds 2-5 6:30pm
Time Control: 40 moves / 90 minutes, game / 60 minutes
Entry Fee: $15, $12 UBC CC members (available at site), $8 juniors, $Free to 
masters and those joining CFC/BCCF for the first time
Registration: 6:30 - 7 pm before round 1
Prizes: Based on entries ($$BEN)
Org & TD: Lyle Craver (604) 980-2040
Misc: half point byes available for rounds 1-4 when requested at least 24 
hours before game time (in person or by phone only please - no e-mail bye 
requests!) Please bring sets, clocks, etc.

Active Chess at the Little Mountain

Dates: Wednesdays June 18, June 25, and July 2nd
Time: 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Location: Little Mountain Neighbourhood House, 3981 Main St. Vancouver (near 
King Edward Ave.) 
Type: Active Swiss
Rounds: 6 in total, 2 per day
Time Control: 40 minutes per game
Categories: Open CFC rated, U1700 CFC rated, Open non-rated, Junior non-rated
Entry fee: Juniors and Seniors always pay $5. Others pay $20 before June 18 
and $30 on June 18. Register at the front desk of the Neighbourhood House.
Prizes: 1st Open rated (fritz 7 + digital chess clock)
1st U1700 rated (digital chess clock)
1st Open non-rated and 1st Junior (chess set + free CFC membership)
Medals and cash prizes BEN
Organizers: Eduardo / Luis Azmitia 604 582 5586 e-mail: 
azmitia@interchange.ubc.ca
Carmen Miranda 604 582 5586
Misc: bring sets and clocks. 
Note: The tournament is organized thanks to the support of Little Mountain 
Neighbourhood House (http://www.littlemountainneighbourhoodhouse.bc.ca/) and 
Chess First! Enterprises (www.northshorechess.com)

Kelowna Summer Fest

Dates: July 5 & 6, 2003
Type: 5 Round Swiss
Times: 9/2/7; 9/asap
Place: Sandman Inn Kelowna B.C. 2130 Harvey Ave across from Orchard Park Mall 
(250) 860-6409
Entry: $25, $20 Seniors, $15 Juniors Non CFC pay entry + $12
Prizes: BEN
TD & Org Wally Steinke & Ian Higgs wsteinke@sd22.bc.ca ph (250) 545-6677 
ianofski@cablelan.net

UBC Tuesday Night Swiss - July - August 2003

Dates: July 15th, July 22nd, July 29th, August 5th, August 12th
Place: UBC Henry Angus Building, Room 421
Rounds: 5 round Swiss System (one round per week)
Time: Round 1; a.s.a.p. after 7pm, Rounds 2-5 6:30pm
Time Control: 40 moves / 90 minutes, game / 60 minutes
Entry Fee: $15, $12 UBC CC members (available at site), $8 juniors, $Free to 
masters and those joining CFC/BCCF for the first time
Registration: 6:30 - 7 pm before round 1
Prizes: Based on entries ($$BEN)
Org & TD: Lyle Craver (604) 980-2040
Misc: half point byes available for rounds 1-4 when requested at least 24 
hours before game time (in person or by phone only please - no e-mail bye 
requests!) Please bring sets, clocks, etc.

BC Open

Dates: August 2-4, 2003
Location: Vancouver Bridge Centre, 2776 East Broadway
Rounds: 6 round Swiss
Times: 10 / 4 ; 10 / 4 ; 10 / asap
Time Control: 40 moves / 120 minutes, game / 60 minutes
Entry Fee: $30, $20 for masters, juniors, and seniors
Registration: 9:30 - 9:50 am before round 1
Prizes: Based on entries ($$BEN)
TD: Stephen Wright
Misc: half point byes available for rounds 1-5.
Information: 
Stephen Wright (604) 221-7148; stphwrg@aol.com
Katherine Davies (604) 266-5842; mail-for-katherine@telus.net

' Culture Jam I'  Active
 
Date: Saturday September 13.2003
Location: Sprott-Shaw College, 2750 Rupert Street, Vancouver, BC
Rds: 5
Type: Regular 6-player Round Robin, CFC-rated
Time: 10 am start
Time control: G 30
Entry Fee:   $15 
Prizes: 1st  ChessBase CD; ALL players receive special prizes
TD/Reg: Vas Sladek, 604-787-4553, chessfm@shaw.ca
Notes: interested players must pre-register by phone or e-mail by September 
1, no onsite registration; digital chess clocks and chess sets provided, CFC 
membership or $10 event fee required; 
Sponsored by: Adbusters Media Foundation and Chess First! Enterprises, 
www.northshorechess.com
 
'Culture Jam II'  Active
 
Date: Saturday October 4.2003
Location: Sprott-Shaw College, 2750 Rupert Street, Vancouver, BC
Rds: 5
Type: Regular 6-player Round Robin, CFC-rated
Time: 10 am start
Time control: G 30
Entry Fee:   $15 
Prizes: 1st  ChessBase CD; ALL players receive special prizes
TD/Reg: Vas Sladek, 604-787-4553, chessfm@shaw.ca
Notes: interested players must pre-register by phone or e-mail by October 1, 
no onsite registration; digital chess clocks and chess sets provided, CFC 
membership or $10 event fee required; 
Sponsored by: Adbusters Media Foundation and Chess First! Enterprises, 
www.northshorechess.com

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