BCCF E-MAIL BULLETIN #26

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Stephen Wright

[N.B. back issues of this Bulletin are now available on the BCCF web site: BC 
Chess Federation Newsletters ]


MIKE'S SUMMER ROUND ROBIN by Mike Stanford

I decided to get a round robin tournament together shortly after finding out 
Jiri Jirka was in Victoria so that local players would get a chance to play 
him.  It started off well with Jack and Harry saying yes, but lost steam when 
many players went from yes to no, and many more stayed at maybe.  Rather than 
let the event collapse I asked the 3 other players if they'd like to play in a 
double quad, they said sure.  And that's the story of how this event became a 
double quad.

Special thanks to Lynn for TDing the event.  Oh, and thanks to all the 
players for playing!

The event went well, each round was a little rough, but fun :).  Jiri 
impressed everyone of course, and we expect to see the GM title by his name in the 
not too distant future.  Of course he'll have to solve the ridiculous time 
trouble he gets himself into!!!

Final results:

Jiri Jirka  5.5
Jack Yoos  3.5
Harry Moore  2
Mike Stanford  1

Stanford,M - Yoos,J [B60] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (1), 15.08.2003

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Nge2 Nf6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 d6 6.Bg5 a6 7.Qd2 Qb6 8.0-0-0 
Qxd4 9.Qxd4 Nxd4 10.Rxd4 Ng4 11.Bh4 g5 12.Bg3 Bg7 13.Rd3 Ne5 14.Rd1 Be6 15.f3 
Rc8 16.Kb1 f5 17.exf5 Bxf5 18.Ne4 0-0 19.Bxe5 Bxe5 20.Bd3 g4 21.fxg4 Bxg4 
22.Rde1 h6 23.h3 Bd7 24.Rhf1 Rxf1 25.Rxf1 Rf8 26.Rxf8+ Kxf8 27.c4 Kf7 28.Kc2 Bc6 
29.b3 Bf4 30.g4 Ke6 31.Nc3 Ke5 32.Nd5 Bg5 33.Bf1 Kd4 34.a3 e6 35.Nc3 Ke3 36.Nd1+ 
Kf3 37.Kd3 Be4+ 38.Kc3 Kg3 39.Kd4 Bg2 0-1

Jirka,J (2400) - Moore,H (2275) [E69] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (1), 
15.08.2003

1.d4 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.Bg2 d6 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 0-0 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.0-0 e5 8.e4 c6 9.h3 
Re8 10.Be3 a5 11.Qc2 exd4 12.Nxd4 Nc5 13.Rad1 Qe7 14.Rfe1 Bd7 15.Bf4 Nh5 
16.Nf5 gxf5 17.Bxd6 Qg5 18.Bxc5 f4 19.g4 Be6 20.Bd6 Rad8 21.e5 f3 22.Bxf3 Nf6 
23.Bg2 Qh4 24.Re3 1-0

Moore,H - Stanford,M [B43] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (2), 15.08.2003

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Bd3 b5 7.0-0 Nf6 8.a4 b4 
9.Na2 Bb7 10.Qe2 d5 11.e5 Nfd7 12.Re1 Nc6 13.Nxc6 Qxc6 14.Bd2 a5 15.Bb5 Qb6 16.c3 
bxc3 17.Nxc3 Bc5 18.Bxd7+ Kxd7 19.Nb5 Ba6 20.Qf3 Rhf8 21.Nc3 Qxb2 22.Ra2 Qb3 
23.Rb1 Qc4 24.Rab2 Qd3 25.Qd1 f6 26.Qg4 fxe5 27.Qxg7+ Kc6 28.Nb5 Rfc8 29.Qxe5 
Qe4 30.Qc3 Rg8 31.g3 Qxa4 32.Na7+ Rxa7 33.Rb6+ 1-0

Yoos,J (2370) - Jirka,J (2400) [C30] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (2), 
16.08.2003

1.e4 e5 2.f4 Bc5 3.Nf3 d6 4.c3 Bb6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Nf6 7.Nc3 Nc6 8.e5 dxe5 
9.fxe5 Nd5 10.Bg5 Nce7 11.Bc4 Be6 12.Qb3 c6 13.0-0 Qd7 14.a4 Nf5 15.Ne2 Nc7 
16.Rfd1 Bxc4 17.Qxc4 a6 18.Ra3 0-0 19.Kh1 Nd5 20.Rad3 h6 21.Bc1 Rfd8 22.Nc3 Qe6 
23.Qb3 Rd7 24.Nxd5 cxd5 25.g4 Ne7 26.g5 h5 27.g6 Qxg6 28.Rg1 Qf5 29.Rg5 Qe6 
30.Rxh5 Rc8 31.Bd2 Bd8 32.Ng5 Qg4 33.Rdh3 Ng6 34.Qd3 Bxg5 35.Rxg5 Qe4+ 36.Qxe4 
dxe4 37.Bc3 Nf4 38.Rhg3 Ne6 39.R5g4 g6 40.Rxe4 Rc4 41.a5 Ra4 42.Rh4 Ra1+ 43.Rg1 
Rxg1+ 44.Kxg1 g5 45.Rg4 Kg7 46.Kf2 Kg6 47.Ke3 Kf5 48.Rg1 Nf4 49.Rf1 f6 50.h4 
fxe5 51.hxg5 exd4+ 52.Bxd4 Re7+ 53.Kd2 Re2+ 54.Kc3 Kxg5 55.Rg1+ Kf5 56.Rg7 Ke6 
57.Rxb7 Nd5+ 58.Kc4 Rc2+ 59.Bc3 Kd6 60.Rh7 Nxc3 61.bxc3 Kc6 62.Ra7 Ra2 
63.Rxa6+ Kc7 64.Kb5 Rd2 65.Kc5 Ra2 66.c4 Kb7 67.Rb6+ Ka7 68.Rb5 Ra4 69.Kd5 Ka6 70.Rc5 
Ra1 71.Kc6 Rh1 72.Rd5 ½-½

Jirka,J - Stanford,M [A60] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (3), 16.08.2003
[Stanford]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 c5 4.d5 exd5 5.cxd5 b5 Before the BC Open I thought I 
should take a look at Jiri just in case I faced him, and decided that I'd play 
this against him because he played a very interesting move as white. 6.Bg2 
[6.f3 The move I half expected him to play.  It's very interesting. 6...c4 A) 
better is 7.a4 Bb7 (7...Bc5?! 8.axb5 Qb6 9.Nh3) 8.e4 a6 9.Be3 Has been played by 
him and I believe it gives white a nice advantage.; B) 7.e4 7...Bc5 and black 
has a pretty good game.] 6...d6 7.e4 [This's the move I most feared.  It's 
also the line that I believe has been considered super good for white ever since 
the time Kasparov crushed Korchnoi in 1983. 7.b4 I didn't look at this very 
much because I didn't think it was a 'Jiri' type move :).] 7...g6 8.Nd2 Usually 
they play a4 before Nd2.  During the game I figured he was trying to trick me 
with a move-order. 8...Bg7 9.a4 b4 10.Nc4 0-0 11.Qc2 Ba6 12.Ne2 Ne8 probably 
dubious.  I played it for 2 reasons.  1:  cover d6 and 2: tie down his 
queenside pieces.  If he moves his dark B, he loses a pawn :). [more active is 
12...Re8 which gives both sides equal chancs.] 13.0-0 Nd7 14.f4 Nb6? on move twelve 
I was always reminding myself, 'Keep that queen on the dark diagonal to 
prevent that knight from coming in via a5.' and then only a few moves later I 
completely ignore my advice.  good goin! [14...Rb8!? 15.Rf3 (if 15.Rb1?? b3 16.Qd3 
Rb4-+) 15...Qc7 16.Rb1 Bxc4 (16...b3 17.Rxb3 Rxb3 18.Qxb3 Nef6 19.Qc2 Rb8 
20.b3) 17.Qxc4 Nef6 and If black can get rolling on the queenside, then he should 
be better.] 15.Na5 Qc7 16.Nc6 Nc4 17.a5 I expected to see this move, and I 
couldn't bring myself to not play my next move. 17...Na3 [After the game Dan 
Scoones said to me that this was stronger.  I can honestly say that I hadn't even 
considered it!  Na3 looked too attractive.  I couldn't get my eyes off that 
square. 17...Nf6 A) 18.e5!? Ng4 and black has a comfortable position here.  
white will lose a B by force, and black's pieces will begin to take over the 
game.(18...dxe5?? 19.b3! and now black is in serious trouble.  his best try is 
19...e4 20.bxc4 Nxd5 21.Ne5 Nf6 22.Bb2+-) ; B) 18.b3 18...Na3!? (18...Ng4 19.bxc4 
Bxa1 20.h3 Nf6 21.Bd2 better for white.) 19.Bxa3 bxa3 20.Rxa3 Rfe8 21.Re1 the 
c6 knight is too strong here.  Black can't shuffle his pieces fast enough to 
gain some initiative for the pawn.; 
17...Bb5 one move I was seriously considering when I played Qc7. I rejected 
it because I didn't want to let his bishop dominate the light squares. 18.Ra2 
a6 19.b3 Bxc6 20.bxc4 (20.dxc6 Nxa5 but of course no black's doing super...) 
20...Bb7 with an equalish position.] 18.Qd1 [18.bxa3!? b3 19.Qxb3 Bxa1 20.Be3 
Bg7 -/+] 18...Nb5?! [stronger is 18...Nc4 19.e5 (19.Qc2 Na3 lets me repeat moves 
at the very least.; 19.Ra2 Bb5 20.b3 Bxc6 21.bxc4 leads to a similar position 
in previous analysis.) 19...dxe5 20.fxe5 (20.b3?! e4 an improved version of 
an earlier variation.) 20...Nxe5 21.Bf4 f6 22.Rc1 Qd6 Here white does have some 
play for the pawn, but black also has some nice targets looming in the 
position.  Black's slightly better here.] 19.e5 Nd4?? 20.Nexd4 Bxf1 21.Kxf1+- oopsy! 
 in my calculations I thought he'd take with the bishop.  Unfortunately for 
me it doesn't really matter which way he takes. [21.Bxf1 cxd4 22.Qxd4 dxe5 
23.fxe5 Nd6 24.Qxb4 Nf5 Nothing can be done to save my position.  Knight > Rook!] 
21...cxd4 22.Qxd4 dxe5 23.fxe5 Qb7 24.d6 Qb5+ 25.Kg1 1-0

Moore,H - Yoos,J [B88] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (3), 16.08.2003

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Bc4 Bd7 7.0-0 e6 8.Bb3 Be7 
9.Be3 0-0 10.f4 Nxd4 11.Bxd4 Bc6 12.Qd3 b5 13.Nxb5 Bxb5 14.Qxb5 Nxe4 15.Qb7 d5 
16.Kh1 Bc5 17.Bxc5 Nxc5 18.Qb5 Qb6 19.Qe2 a5 20.c3 Nxb3 21.axb3 Qxb3 22.Ra3 
Qb6 23.Rfa1 d4 24.cxd4 Qxd4 25.Ra4 Qd5 26.Qf3 Qxf3 27.gxf3 Rab8 28.Rxa5 g6 
29.Kg2 Rxb2+ 30.Kg3 Kg7 31.Ra8 Rxa8 32.Rxa8 Rb1 33.Ra5 Rd1 34.Rc5 Rd5 35.Rc7 g5 
36.Ra7 gxf4+ 37.Kxf4 Rh5 38.Kg3 Kg6 39.Rb7 Rg5+ 40.Kf2 Ra5 41.Rc7 Ra4 42.Kg3 e5 
43.Rc6+ f6 44.Rc8 Ra3 45.Rc4 Kf5 46.Rb4 Ra7 47.Rc4 Rg7+ 48.Kf2 Re7 49.Kg3 Rd7 
50.Ra4 Rd4 51.Ra5 Kg5 52.Ra7 h5 53.Rg7+ Kh6 54.Rg8 Kh7 55.Ra8 h4+ 56.Kg2 Kg6 
57.Ra2 Kg5 58.Kf2 Kf4 59.Rb2 f5 60.Ra2 h3 61.Rb2 Ra4 62.Rc2 Ra1 63.Rc4+ e4 
64.fxe4 fxe4 65.Rc3 Ra2+ 66.Kg1 e3 67.Rc1 Kf3 68.Rf1+ Ke2 69.Rb1 Rd2 70.Re1+ Kxe1 
0-1

Moore,H - Jirka,J [D15] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (4), 16.08.2003

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 a6 5.c5 g6 6.Bf4 Nh5 7.Be5 f6 8.Bxb8 Rxb8 
9.e4 e5 10.exd5 cxd5 11.dxe5 Bxc5 12.exf6 Nxf6 13.Qe2+ Kf7 14.0-0-0 Re8 15.Qd2 
Kg7 16.Nd4 Qc7 17.f3 b5 18.Kb1 b4 19.Nce2 Qb6 20.g4 a5 21.h4 Ba6 22.h5 Bxe2 
23.Nxe2 Be3 24.Qd3 b3 25.a3 Rbc8 26.hxg6 hxg6 27.g5 Bxg5 28.f4 Re3 29.Qd2 Ne4 
30.Qe1 Bf6 31.Rxd5 Qc6 32.Qd1 Qc2+ 33.Qxc2 Rxc2 34.Rd7+ Kf8 35.Bg2 Nd2+ 36.Ka1 
Bxb2# 0-1

Yoos,J - Stanford,M [B42] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (4), 16.08.2003

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Bd3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nec6 7.Nb3 d6 8.Qh5 g6 
9.Qh3 Bg7 10.Bh6 e5 11.Qe3 0-0 12.h4 f6 13.Bc4+ Kh8 14.h5 g5 15.Bxg7+ Kxg7 
16.h6+ Kh8 17.a4 Nb4 18.Qd2 Qc7 19.Bd5 N8c6 20.0-0-0 Ne7 21.Kb1 Bd7 22.Bxb7 Qxb7 
23.Qxd6 Bxa4 24.Nxa4 Ra7 25.Nbc5 Qb5 26.c3 Nbc6 27.Ne6 Rf7 28.Nac5 Ra8 29.Nc7 
1-0

Jirka,J - Yoos,J [D02] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (5), 17.08.2003

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.g3 Bg4 4.Bg2 Qd7 5.Ne5 Nxe5 6.dxe5 e6 7.0-0 f5 8.c4 c6 
9.b3 Be7 10.Ba3 Qc7 11.f4 Qb6+ 12.Rf2 Bxa3 13.Nxa3 h5 14.Nc2 h4 15.Nd4 hxg3 
16.hxg3 Kf7 17.Qd3 a6 18.b4 Ne7 19.Rb1 Qd8 20.c5 Qg8 21.Rff1 Rh5 22.Kf2 g5 23.e3 
Qg7 24.Rh1 Rah8 25.Rxh5 Rxh5 26.Rh1 Rxh1 27.Bxh1 Qh6 28.Bg2 Ng6 29.Kg1 Qh5 
30.a4 Bh3 31.Nf3 gxf4 32.exf4 Bxg2 33.Ng5+ Ke7 34.Kxg2 Nxe5 35.Qe3 Ng4 36.Qxe6+ 
Kf8 37.Qc8+ Kg7 38.Qxb7+ Kh8 39.Qc8+ Kg7 40.Qd7+ Kh8 41.Qd8+ Kg7 42.Qe7+ Kg8 
43.Qe6+ Kg7 44.Nf3 Qf7 45.Qxf7+ Kxf7 46.Ne5+ 1-0

Stanford,M - Moore,H [B96] Mike's Summer RR-03 Victoria (5), 17.08.2003
[Mike Stanford]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 Might sound strange, but 
this's the last thing I expected to see him play! 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Nbd7 8.Qf3 Qc7 
9.0-0-0 b5 I think this's one of the more crazier moves that black can employ.  It 
can become super sharp, and there're loads of variations where white can sack 
a piece for the attack. 10.Bxb5 The line I decided to play vs. this is just 
one of the many crazy variations  [A good example of another var is the 
following game.   10.Bd3 Bb7 11.Rhe1 Be7 12.Qg3 b4 13.Nd5 exd5 14.exd5 Kd8 15.Nc6+ 
(15.Rxe7) 15...Bxc6 16.dxc6 Nc5 17.Bh4 Bf8 18.Bc4 Ra7 19.Bd5 a5 20.Re3 Qc8 
21.Rde1 Qf5 22.Bxf6+ gxf6 23.Re8+ Kc7 24.Qf3 h5 25.Kb1 Bg7 26.Rxh8 Bxh8 27.Bxf7 Kb6 
28.Bxh5 a4 29.Bg4 Qh7 30.c7 Rxc7 31.Qd5 f5 32.Qxd6+ Rc6 33.Qd8+ Qc7 34.Qxh8 
fxg4 35.Qd4 Kb5 36.b3 axb3 37.axb3 Qd6 38.Qc4+ Ka5 39.Re5 Qd1+ 40.Ka2 Qd6 
41.Rd5 Qc7 42.f5 Kb6 43.Qxb4+ Ka7 44.Qd4 1-0 Kotronias,V-Le Siège,A/Montréal 2002 
(44)] 10...axb5 11.Ndxb5 Qb8 12.e5 Bb7 [12...Ra5 is another decent move.] 
13.Qe2 dxe5 14.Qc4 Bc5 [14...Be7!?] 15.Bxf6 Be3+ 16.Kb1 gxf6 17.Rxd7 It's always 
possible to try and enter an endgame in these types of variations where you're 
down the piece for a bunch of pawns (refer to Lesiege game), but I had no 
intentions of doing that, and felt that Rxd was the only way to continue the 
attack. 17...0-0?? This's the first new move in the game, and for good reason.  
Black's obligated to take the rook. [17...Kxd7 18.Rd1+ Bd4 19.fxe5 fxe5 The only 
problem is that too often the best black can hope for is a perp, and he/she has 
to jump through a lot of hoops to get there.] 18.f5!? exf5? I did not expect 
to see this! [18...Bc8 19.fxe6 Bxd7 20.exd7+- White's got 4 passed pawn for 
the exchange.  nuff said.] 19.Nd6 Ba6 20.Qh4 Bg5 21.Qh5 Ra7 22.h4 [I 
contemplated playing 22.Rxa7 Qxd6 (22...Qxa7 23.h4 would be like the game, but better :)) 
23.Rd1+- but didn't want to give him any reason to play on.] 22...Bd2 23.Nxf5 
[23.Nd5!? Rxd7 24.Nxf5 (24.Nxf6+ Kg7 25.Nxd7 Qxd6 26.Nxf8 Kxf8 27.Qxf5) 
24...Rxd5 25.Qg4+ Bg5 26.hxg5 I looked at this, but thought the text would be a 
little faster.] 23...Kh8 [Last try would be 23...Qxb2+!? 24.Kxb2 Rb8+ 25.Ka3 
(25.Ka1?? Bxc3#) 25...Bb7+ 26.Na4 Rxa4+ 27.Kxa4 Bc6+ 28.Ka3+-] 24.Rxd2 1-0


BC OPEN HISTORY

Last issue we gave a list of previous winners of the BC Open.  Well, as 
pointed out by Dan Scoones, there were actually two BC Opens in 1972, so the 
revised list should look like this:

1970 Anthony Zaradic
1971 Duncan Suttles
1972 (March) Peter Biyiasas, Elod Macskasy, Stan Pakosta and Bob Zuk
1972 (October) Bruce Harper, Dan Scoones, Stan Pakosta
1973 Duncan Suttles
1974 Brian McLaren
1975 Joe Oszvald

Why two, you might ask?  It had something to do with the BC Open being a BC 
Championship qualifier.  The format for the 1973 BC Championship involved a 
semifinal stage in March, which was around the time the BC open was normally 
held.  Since a qualifier was still required, a second BC Open was held in October 
of 1972, and the tournament was held at this time in the subsequent years.

Pakosta,S - Biyiasas,P [B09] BC op (1) Burnaby (3), 25.03.1972

1.d4 g6 2.e4 Bg7 3.f4 d6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Nc3 c5 6.Bb5+ Bd7 7.e5 Ng4 8.e6 Bxb5 
9.exf7+ Kxf7 10.Ng5+ Kg8 11.Nxb5 Qd7 12.dxc5 Nf6 13.Qe2 Nc6 14.cxd6 exd6 15.0-0 
Re8 16.Qd3 d5 17.Bd2 a6 18.Nd4 Nxd4 19.Qxd4 Ne4 20.Qd3 Nc5 21.Qf3 h6 22.Nh3 
Bxb2 23.Rae1 Ne4 24.Qd3 Kh7 25.c4 Nf6 26.Rb1 Qc6 27.Rxb2 dxc4 28.Qf3 Nd5 29.f5 
Rhf8 30.fxg6+ Kg8 31.Qd1 c3 32.Rc2 Qb6+ 33.Kh1 Qb5 34.Rf7 Qd3 35.Nf2 Qd4 36.h3 
cxd2 37.Rxd2 Qc3 38.Rxf8+ Kxf8 39.Ng4 h5 40.Qf1+ Ke7 41.Qf7+ Kd8 42.Rxd5+ 1-0

Pakosta,S - Pankhurst,J [C00] BC op (2) Vancouver (3), 07.10.1972

1.e4 e6 2.Qe2 c5 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.f4 d6 6.Nf3 Ne7 7.d3 0-0 8.c3 Nbc6 9.Be3 
b6 10.Na3 Bb7 11.h4 h5 12.g4 hxg4 13.Ng5 Bf6 14.Qxg4 Bxg5 15.hxg5 Kg7 
16.0-0-0 d5 17.Rh7+ 1-0


THIRTY YEARS AGO by Bruce Harper

While I may have taken the summer off as far as this column is concerned, 
1973 was a very busy summer in Canadian chess.  For one thing, Grandmaster Duncan 
Suttles was very active, winning both the Canadian Open in Ottawa and the 
U.S. Open in Chicago (as far as I know, a unique achievement).  But today's game 
comes from across the border, where a brash 12-year old challenged the 
reigning Seattle Champion to a six-game match, winner take all (each side put up $200 
- no small sum in those days, or even now).

The "reigning champion" was Robert A. Karch, a long-time stalwart of chess in 
the northwest.  And the brash 12-year old was Yasser Seirawan, who had been 
playing tournament chess for only eight months and who had a 1900 USCF rating.

Below is the final game of the match, with Seirawan leading 3-2.  White 
therefore needed a win to tie the match.

Karch, R - Seirawan, Y  Seattle, 1973 (Match)

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.b3 b6 
9.Bb2 Bb7 10.Qe2 Rc8 11.Rfd1 Bd6 12.Rac1 Qe7 13.Rc2 Rfd8 14.h3 h6 15.Re1 Re8 
16.Qd1 Red8 17.Qb1 Re8 18.Rce2

While the opening has been rather dry (it resembles a 19th century Queen's 
Gambit), bear in mind that Black only needed to draw.  With this in mind, Yasser 
adopted a maneuvering style, shifting his pieces back and forth in the finest 
Petrosian style.  In a 12-year old, this in itself shows remarkable 
self-control and psychological insight.  And, as intended, it gave White a chance to 
misplace his pieces.  Now Yasser springs into action.

18...dxc4! 19.bxc4 e5! 20.dxe5 Nxe5 21.Nxe5 Qxe5 22.f4 Qh5 23.Ne4 Nxe4 
24.Bxe4 Bb4 25.Bf3 Qh4 26.Rd1 Bc5

Threatening not only 26...Rxe3, but also 26.Qxf4.  White must lose a pawn.

27.Bg4 Rxe3 28.Bd4 Bxd4 29.Rxd4 Rxe2 30.Bxe2 Re8 31.Re4 Rd8!

As I went through this game, I was struck by just how well Yasser played, 
even at this early stage of his career.  It's all there - the patient 
maneuvering, the ability to find the best square for every piece, the tactical skill to 
take advantage of the opponent's slip.  For example, 31...Rd8! declines the 
trade ("trade when your ahead!") in favour of taking the better of the two open 
files and keeping White's queen out of play.

Of course this is all hindsight - no one knew that a legitimate World 
Championship contender was on the rise in the northwest.  But it makes you look twice 
at some of our rising juniors...

32.f5 Qf6 33.c5 Bc8 34.g4 Qc3 35.Qb3 Qxc5+ 36.Kg2 Qd5 37.Qxd5 cxd5 38.Rd4 Bb7 
39.Kg3 Kf8 40.Kf4 Ke7 41.h4 Kd6 42.g5 hxg5+ 43.Kxg5 Re8 44.Bh5 Re7 45.f6 Re5+ 
46.Kf4 g6 47.Bg4 Bc6 48.a3 Bb5 49.a4 Bc4 50.Rd2 a6 0-1


UPCOMING EVENTS

New this time is the Vancouver active Grand Prix at the Little Mountain 
Neighbourhood House.

Individual Chess Matches

Players interested in participating in rated individual chess matches with 
other players of comparable or dissimilar ratings can contact Luis E. Azmitia 
at: azmitia@interchange.ubc.ca 

Please make sure to include in the e-mail: your name, your rating, type of 
game preferred (i.e. active), and the rating range of possible opponents. Note 
that the games will be held in the Vancouver area.

Nick Beqo's Sunday Tournaments

Practice your openings and improve your chess, by playing in a quiet and 
beautiful park!
You get to know the pairings one day before, so you can study your opponents, 
and your home preparations will surprise us! Games, often annotated by 
players or masters, will be available.

Dates: Every Sunday (sunny or rainy), 12:00PM - 6:00PM
Entry Fee: $5.00 Free entry for the highest rated player!
Prizes: 1st - $30.00 2nd - $20.00.
Location: Bear Creek Park, Surrey, B.C. The covered area on 140th Street side.
The park is between King George Hwy, 140th Street, 88th Ave & 84th Ave. 
To get there, you can take a bus from King George skytrain station.
Participants and pairings: based on FIDE or CFC ELO active rating system. 
Time control: G15
Rounds: 11 Round Robin. 30min. break after the 6th round (3:00-3:30)
Sponsors: none (so far). All sponsors will be advertised on this website.
Registrations: via e-mail at: nickbeqo@hotmail.com Dead line: Friday 11:00 PM.
Bring your own chess set, and clock.
Note:
a) Sportsmanship is required. No draw offers or draw claims, unless DEAD 
DRAW! 
This rule is not only because it is a speed chess tournament, but also 
because there would be no room for pre-arrangements in order to split the prize. It 
will be unfair to other players.
b) Rated events require at least 25 min time control. This will reduce both, 
the number of players for a round robin-event, and also the prizes, since a 
part of entry fees has to go to Federation. Depends on the number of players, I 
might run two events at the same time: 
1. unrated tournament with 12 players, and 15 min time control.
2. rated tournament with 6 players, and 25 min time control.
c) I am organizing this tournament in order to help chess players, especially 
in Fraser Valley, as it is too far to play in Croatian Center or Vancouver 
Bridge Center. Therefore, chess players are going to make the tournament rules, 
not me. I am open to suggestions and make the respective changes. 
Remember: 100% of the entry fees go to prizes!

II Friday Night Chess at the Croatian

Hosted by the Croatian Chess Club
DATES: August 8 + each Friday thereafter
TIME: 7:00 P.M 
PLACE: Croatian Cultural Centre 3250 Commercial Drive Vancouver Entrance 
through the Members Lounge or Restaurant 
ENTRY FEE: Juniors and Seniors $5; others $10;free for members joining the 
CFC* 
TOURNAMENT TYPE: Round Robin or Double RR depending on entries. A Maximum of 
10 Rounds. Players grouped according to CFC rating. 90 min / 30 moves + 1hour 
SD
PRIZES: Cash prizes based on entries
ORGANIZERS: Eduardo / Luis Azmitia Tel: 604- 582-5586Robert Topic
MISC: Bring clocks and sets if possible. Byes available. Games missed can be 
played during the week at convenience of players. Late entrants welcome.
*Visit Chess Federation of Canada for details of membership to the Chess 
Federation of Canada. 

2nd. Little Mountain Active Chess Tournament

DATES: Wednesdays August 20 & 27
TIME: 7:00 P.M (registration at 6:45 P.M.) 
PLACE: Little Mountain Neighbourhood House.3981 Main St. Vancouver. (near 
King Edward Ave.) ENTRY FEE: $5 non rated section; $10 rated section.Juniors and 
Seniors always $5. 
TOURNAMENT TYPE: 5 rounds; 30 min. game; Swiss pairings.
CATEGORIES:I) Open CFC rated* (open to any player with CFC rating and 
membership)II) Open non-rated (no restrictions)III) Junior rated
PRIZES: 1st Open rated, 1st Open non-rated, Best U1700, Best Juniors. The 
prizes include chess software, chess clocks, chess sets, and medals.
ORGANIZERS: Eduardo / Luis Azmitia Tel: 604- 582-5586Carmen Miranda Tel: 
604-879-7104
MISC: Bring clocks and sets if possible.Note: The tournament is organized 
thanks to the support of Little Mountain Neighbourhood House 
(http://www.littlemountainneighbourhoodhouse.bc.ca/) and 
Chess First! Enterprises (www.northshorechess.com)

*for details of membership visit Chess Federation of Canada 

Mad Rapid (rated)

Sat., 23 August 2003
Vancouver Bridge Centre, 2776 E. Broadway, Vancouver, BC
Guaranteed Prizes: First Place: $150, First Under-2200 (CFC regular rating) 
$60.
Format: 5 round swiss; TC: G/30; Byes: Rds. 1-4 max 1
Reg: 9-9:30am; Rds: 10am, 11:15am, 1pm, 2:15pm, 3:30pm; 
EF: Jr or 1st time CFC annual members $10, Others $20; 
EF as minimum prize for masters and FIDE titled players (not eligible for 
class prizes). 
Ratings: Rated by CFC active system. CFC/BCCF m/s required.
Pairings & Class Prizes will use regular (i.e. non-active) CFC ratings.
Misc: No smoking and no computers. Free Lunch will be provided for all 
players in the Mad Rapid!
FIDE Master Gary Basanta will be participating in all of the Mad Chess 
Festival events.
Simultaneous: Players may play in the Mad Rapid & the Mad Active at the same 
time.
Info: NTD Henry Chiu (604) 515-8046; madmadchess@hotmail.com; details @ 
www.chess.bc.ca 

Mad Active (non-rated)

Sat., 23 August 2003; Vancouver Bridge Centre, 2776 E. Broadway, Vancouver, BC
Guaranteed First Prize: $100; 
EF: $10; No CFC m/s required. Non-rated event.
Reg: 9-9:30am; Format: 5 round swiss; TC: G/30; 
FIDE Master Gary Basanta will be playing. Players may play in Mad Rapid & Mad 
Active at the same time.
Info: NTD Henry Chiu (604) 515-8046; madmadchess@hotmail.com; www.chess.bc.ca 

Mad Blitz

Sat., 23 August 2003; Vancouver Bridge Centre, 2776 E. Broadway, Vancouver, BC
Guaranteed First Prize: $100; Reg: 4:45-5pm
EF: $5: Byes: Max 4; Format: 7 double round swiss: TC: G/5 
Rules: FIDE blitz chess rules will be used, touch move in effect
Info: NTD Henry Chiu (604) 515-8046; madmadchess@hotmail.com; details @ 
www.chess.bc.ca 

Mad Simul

Sat., 23 August 2003; Vancouver Bridge Centre, 2776 E. Broadway, Vancouver, BC
FIDE Master Gary Basanta will be playing up to 30 <2200 players 
simultaneously using clocks!!!
Entry Fee: $5 for one game, $10 for two games (one white, one black); Reg: 
8-8:15pm
TC: G/60; Colors: If player chooses white, master has draw odds.
Prizes: Double entry fee will be returned if player wins. Entry fee will be 
returned if player chose black and draws. Prizes may only be claimed by players 
who have been keeping score up until they have less than five minutes on 
clock. Touch move in effect.
Info: NTD Henry Chiu (604) 515-8046; madmadchess@hotmail.com; details @ 
www.chess.bc.ca 

Labour Day Open, Victoria

DATES: August 30, 31 and Sept.1st.
SITE: UVic H&S Development Bldg. Room 264.
TYPE: 6Rd. Swiss
RDS: 10:00, 4:00, Sunday 10:00, 4:00, Monday 9:00 and A.S.A.P.
ENTRY FEE: $30.00, $25.00 For Jrs. Srs.
PRIZES: Entry Fees minus expenses, returned as Prizes.
CONTACT: L. Stringer, 250 658-5207 or lynnstringer@shaw.ca
MISC: Please bring clocks and sets if possible.

Challenge the Masters Multi-Master Simul Tournament
(A 2005 Elod Macskasy Memorial Fundraising Event)

Join fellow chess enthusiasts on Sunday, Sept 7, 2003, for a full day of 
entertainment by challenging three teams of masters in a 3 round simultaneous 
tournament. Here's your chance to play against teams consisting of GM Duncan 
Suttles, FM Jack Yoos, FM Bruce Harper, Fanhao Meng, and other masters/experts. 

Date: September 7, 2003
Location: Vancouver Bridge Center, 2776 East Broadway (Broadway and Kaslo)
Registration: Sept 7, 9:00-9:30 am
Pre-registration: Deadline for pre-registration, Sept 1, 2003
Format: Three-round simultaneous. 
Time Control 60 minutes for each side, with one-minute increments for the 
master teams.
Rounds: Round 1: 10:00 am; Round 2: 1:00 pm; Round 3: ASAP.
Entry fee: $20 per adult. $15 for juniors. Pre-register to guarantee a spot - 
participation will be limited to the first 40 registrants.
Equipment: scoresheets will be provided. Please bring set, and digital clock, 
if you have one.
Information: contact Richard Reid, (604) 589-4214, rreid@smartt.com

NOTE: This is a fundraising event, open to all, but limited to the first 40 
entrants. The intent is to raise money to help bring titled players to the 2005 
Elod Macskasy Memorial tournament, and thereby provide an opportunity for 
some of our local players to make IM and GM norms. 

Culture Jam I Active

Date: Saturday September 13.2003
Location: Sprott-Shaw College, 2750 Rupert Street, Vancouver, BC
Rds: 5
Type: Regular 6-player Round Robin, CFC-rated
Time: 10 am start
Time control: G 30
Entry Fee: $15 
Prizes: 1st ChessBase CD; ALL players receive special prizes
TD/Reg: Vas Sladek, 604-787-4553, chessfm@shaw.ca
Notes: interested players must pre-register by phone or e-mail by September 
1, no onsite registration; digital chess clocks and chess sets provided, CFC 
membership or $10 event fee required; 
Sponsored by: Adbusters Media Foundation and Chess First! Enterprises, 
www.northshorechess.com

3rd. Little Mountain Active Chess Tournament (Stage 1 of the Fall Grand-Prix)

Dates: Wednesdays September 17 & 24 
Time: 7:00 P.M (registration at 6:45 P.M.) 
Place: Little Mountain Neighbourhood House, 3981Main St. Vancouver. 
(near King Edward Ave.) 
Entry Fee: $3 non rated section; $10 rated section. 
           Juniors and Seniors always $5. Special discounts for families.
TOURNAMENT TYPE: 6 rounds; 30G;  Swiss pairings. 
CATEGORIES: 
I) Open CFC rated* (open to any player with CFC rating and membership) 
II) Open non-rated (no restrictions) 
III) Junior rated 
GRAND PRIX PRIZES: Trophies for 1st, 2nd, 3rd places of Open rated and U1700. 
Medals for 1st non-rated and for best juniors. 
Plus special prizes such as chess software, clocks, sets and gift 
certificates (Chess First! Enterprises).
TOURNAMENT PRIZES: 1st Place of each category gets a free entry 
for a subsequent stage of the Fall Grand Prix, and a award certificate.
Organizers: Eduardo / Luis Azmitia Tel: 604-582-5586 
Carmen Miranda Tel: 604- 879- 7104 
Misc: Bring clocks and sets if possible. 
Note: The tournament is organized thanks to the support of Little Mountain 
Neighbourhood House (http://www.littlemountainneighbourhoodhouse.bc.ca/) and 
Chess First! Enterprises (www.northshorechess.com) 
*Visit (www.chess.ca) for details of membership to the Chess Federation of 
Canada. 

All Juniors U1500 Little Mountain Chess Tournament 

DATES: Monday September 22 & 29
TIME: 7:00 P.M (registration at 6:45 P.M.) 
PLACE: Little Mountain Neighbourhood House, 3981 Main St. Vancouver. (near 
King Edward Ave.) ENTRY FEE: $5.00
TOURNAMENT TYPE: 4-5 rounds; 25 min. game; Swiss pairings.
CATEGORIES: I) U1500 II) U800
PRIZES: Special prizes for all participants.
ORGANIZERS: Eduardo / Luis Azmitia Tel: 604- 582-5586Carmen Miranda Tel: 604- 
879- 7104
MISC: Bring clocks and sets if possible. The tournament is organized thanks 
to the support of Little Mountain Neighbourhood House 
(www.littlemountainneighbourhoodhouse.bc.ca) &
Chess First! Enterprises( www.northshorechess.com)
*Visit (www.chess.ca) for details of membership to the Chess Federation of 
Canada. 

Conquest of Cool FIDE Invitational

Date: September 26-28, 2003
Place: Sprott-Shaw College, 2750 Rupert Street, Vancouver, BC
Rds: 5
Type: Regular closed 6-player RR, FIDE & CFC rated
Times: 6:30pm/10am, 3:30 pm/10am, ASAP
TC: 120+30
EF: $50 FIDE rated; $80 FIDE unrated, minimum CFC rating 2000 
Prizes: 1st $150 plus ChessBase CD prize
Reg: interested FIDE-rated players please e-mail TD/Org:Vas Sladek, 
chessfm@shaw.ca or call 604-787-4553, 604-982-0611, players must pre-register by 
September 21, 2003, NO onsite registrations.
Misc: CFC membership required, no smoking, chess sets and clocks provided
Sponsors: Chess First! Enterprises www.northshorechess.com

Culture Jam II Active

Date: Saturday October 4.2003
Location: Sprott-Shaw College, 2750 Rupert Street, Vancouver, BC
Rds: 5
Type: Regular 6-player Round Robin, CFC-rated
Time: 10 am start
Time control: G 30
Entry Fee: $15 
Prizes: 1st ChessBase CD; ALL players receive special prizes
TD/Reg: Vas Sladek, 604-787-4553, chessfm@shaw.ca
Notes: interested players must pre-register by phone or e-mail by October 1, 
no onsite registration; digital chess clocks and chess sets provided, CFC 
membership or $10 event fee required; 
Sponsored by: Adbusters Media Foundation and Chess First! Enterprises, 
www.northshorechess.com

BC Championship

DATE: October 11-13
SITE: UVic, H&S Development Bldg.
RATING: Must be over 2000
ENTRY FEE: $35.00
CONTACT: L. Stringer 658-5207 or lynnstringer@shaw.ca

4th. Little Mountain Active Chess Tournament (Stage 2 of the Fall Grand-Prix)

Dates: Wednesdays October 15 & 22 
Details: see September 17 Active

Stop the Machine FIDE Invitational

Date: October 24-26, 2003
Place: Sprott-Shaw College, 2750 Rupert Street, Vancouver, BC
Rds: 5
Type: Regular closed 6-player RR, FIDE & CFC rated
Times: 6:30pm/10am, 3:30 pm/10am, ASAP
TC: 120+30
EF: $50 FIDE rated; $80 FIDE unrated, minimum CFC rating 2000 
Prizes: 1st $150 plus ChessBase CD prize
Reg: interested FIDE-rated players please e-mail TD/Org:Vas Sladek, 
chessfm@shaw.ca or call 604-787-4553, 604-982-0611, players must pre-register by 
October 19, NO onsite registrations.
Misc: CFC membership required, no smoking, chess sets and clocks provided
Sponsors: Chess First! Enterprises www.northshorechess.com

5th. Little Mountain Active Chess Tournament (Stage 3 of the Fall Grand-Prix)

Dates: Wednesdays November 19 & 26 
Details: see September 17 Active

Kitsilano Beach FIDE Invitational

Date: Saturday November 28-30, 2003
Details to be announced.

6th. Little Mountain Active Chess Tournament (Stage 4 -final- of the Fall 
Grand-Prix)

Dates: Wednesdays December 10 & 17 
Details: see September 17 Active

Kamloops Grand Prix 2004

Details: see the BCCF website

Chess First! FIDE Invitational

Date: April 8-12, 2004
Type: Regular closed 10-player RR, FIDE & CFC rated
Reg: interested FIDE-rated players please e-mail TD/Org:Vas Sladek, 
chessfm@shaw.ca or call 604-787-4553, 604-982-0611, players must pre-register by April 
1, 2004, NO onsite registrations.
(Details coming later.) 

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